Voter Suppression Backfires in North Carolina, Spreads in Texas

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This post originally appeared at The Nation.


Voter ID Students
Participants listen during a news conference at the Board of Elections in Raleigh, NC, Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2013. The North Carolina Board of Elections says a student at Elizabeth City State University can run for city council. The board voted unanimously to allow Montravias King to run for the seat representing the campus. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

Shortly after passing the country’s worst voter suppression law, North Carolina Republicans targeted student voting.

The GOP-controlled board of elections in Pasquotank County voted to prevent a student at a historically black college from running for city council where he attended school. The GOP-controlled board of election in Watauga County shut down an early voting site at Appalachian State University in Boone and placed the general election polling place at a campus nightclub instead of the student union.

Both of these moves backfired badly on the North Carolina GOP in the 2013 local elections.

The North Carolina state board of elections ruled that Montravias King, a senior at Elizabeth City State University could indeed run for the city council where he attended school, which he said was his primary residence. On October 9, King was elected to the Elizabeth City city council, winning the most votes of any candidate. He’s now the youngest elected official in the state.

In Boone, Democrats swept races for mayor and three city council seats on Tuesday. Voter turnout increased compared to municipal elections in 2009. “This result in some ways speaks to the visceral reaction people have when you try to take people’s voting rights away,” said new Mayor Andy Ball, a former ASU student. Boone Democrats said the Republicans they canvassed were equally unhappy with the board of elections’ decisions and didn’t turn out as a result.

These local elections had far more exposure because of GOP attempts to restrict student voting than they otherwise would have. Rachel Maddow broadcast from North Carolina. The national media, yours truly included, closely followed the story. Like we saw in 2012, voters don’t like it when you try to limit their voting rights.

(It’s worth noting that the new restrictions passed by the North Carolina legislature this year don’t go into effect until 2014 for most provisions and 2016 for voter ID.)

The news on voting rights was much worse in Texas, where voters experienced many problems with the new voter ID law.

The disastrous ramifications of the Supreme Court’s decision striking down Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act are also being felt in more subtle ways at the local level. In Pasadena, Texas — a city of 150,000 near Houston where Hispanics make up a third of the vote — voters on Tuesday approved by 87 votes an amendment changing how districts are allocated in the city. As SCOTUSblog reported, there were previously eight city council districts in Pasadena. But the amendment narrowly adopted by voters shrunk the number of districts to six, eliminating two predominantly Hispanic districts, while creating two “at-large” seats that will be decided by the town’s white majority. It’s the type of discriminatory voting change that would’ve likely been blocked by Section 5 of the VRA, but will now go into effect. “The Justice Department can no longer tell us what to do,” said Pasadena Mayor Johnny Isbell.

The same type of thing happened recently in Beaumont, Texas, where white conservatives gained control of a previously black-majority school board.

For many years, states like Texas used devices like at-large elections to prevent blacks and Hispanics from holding office. Litigation under the VRA invalidated many of these discriminatory districts. Now things are once again headed the other way.

Ari Berman is a contributing writer for The Nation magazine and an Investigative Journalism Fellow at The Nation Institute. His first book, Herding Donkeys: The Fight to Rebuild the Democratic Party and Reshape American Politics, was published in October 2010 by Farrar, Straus, and Giroux. He is now working on a history of voting rights since 1965. Tweet him @AriBerman.
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  • Anonymous

    Chief Justice John Robert is the New Jim Crow.

  • Marty Cox

    Great article..keep it up!!!

  • Marty Cox

    Investigative reporting at it’s best!!! We need you…

  • Carol Wright

    Wow, so the white Republicans use both gerrymandering more districts and giving relatively low population, slices of white right wingers, MORE reps than they would normally deserve…while democratic districts are larger and they get less reps even if having comparatively larger population…AND now stripping individual districts out and having “at large,” knowing whites would win.

    Is not the Supreme Court seeing this blatant violation? Why is legal action not taken against this. This is right out on in the open they are pulling this crap. all the while saying “to prevent voter fraud”…disgusting. These people are DISGUSTING, beneath contempt.

  • Anonymous

    I had a discussion with the public relations rep for our congressman about how horrible these voter suppression laws are at a town hall he was holding, even here is PA where they are not as bad as some other states. She continued to insist that they only existed to eliminate voter fraud. When I pointed out that there was essentially no voter fraud taking place, she had the nerve to say that even so we needed these laws to make sure that it didn’t. I mentioned how these laws are acting like a poll tax in some States because even though the IDs may be free, many people often don’t have the required documentation available to get the free IDs and therefore have to pay a fee for the documentation. She didn’t care.She even tossed off the statements of the head of the republican party in the State about how “voter ID was going to win the State for Mitt Romney” last year as a “misstatement.” she even had an excuse for shortening early voting or disallowing certain forms of evidence for registration of voting as ways to prevent fraud.

    I got the impression that she sincerely believed what she was saying, in spite of clear evidence to the contrary. While I am certain that the real reason for these laws is to suppress votes, it is scary that there are so many people like this young woman who either don’t care or are unwilling to accept that fact. The only way to deal with this issue is to vote the bums out of office. It is encouraging to see that happening in areas like this.

  • Anonymous

    It would be good if on the federal level they changed the voting age to 16. This is when many teens get their license and should be registered to vote at the same time. In defense of this, most teens at 16 are better educated than our founders at the same age. It would make students aware of their civic responsibility at a younger age and get them started as a voter before they left high school. There should be a special voting poll open to students on the high school campus available to students before and after school and during study halls.

  • mikeatle

    As I understand it, the U.S. Supreme Court cannot do anything against these new Jim Crow laws unless someone brings an action against the laws and takes it through the lower courts first. The Supreme Court cannot initiate action. It’s going to take someone or a group bringing a suit against the state to get the ball rolling.

  • Marvin Gilbert

    Lookie here!

  • Victor Jacinto Cano

    The Supreme Court you say? Bough and paid for, after ruling for Citizens United, and the recent ruling on the civil right voter rights , I hardly have any faith in the “Supreme ” being concerned about voter’s rights unless of course you’re a corporation

  • Anonymous

    And she sincerely believes that only white, rich, Christian folks know what is best for the country! The end justifies the means. They are actually on record for believing so.

  • Melva

    The reaction to all these restrictions on voting rights will backfire in most places. It really makes people angry when their rights are infringed and they defend themselves by going to vote and getting their family and friends to do so also. It will be great to see that happen over and over again until these Republican, middle aged white men understand they are no longer in charge. Women, students, African Americans and Hispanics rise up and make your voices heard. We won’t take this affront to our dignity. We will go vote no matter what obstacles you try to put in our way.

  • Anonymous

    Activism is where it’s at. We sit by and the bastards will take over for sure.

  • Ree

    Most 18 year olds know a lot more than most 70 year olds, and white people know this, hence they’re not wanting younger people to vote.

  • Martin Wiescholek

    An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it.

    (Gandhi)

    “You can’t escape the responsibility of tomorrow by evading it today.”

    ~ Abraham Lincoln

  • William F Thomas

    Please keep us posted with more reporting like this. Thanks!

  • joe ebbitt

    Thank God, we are finally motivated enough to get out and vote, more importantly we are starting to pay attention to what the GOP has in store for us. As a result of the “Roberts Five” pre-approval of deceitful voting practices is no longer law ,so the fun has just begun. Now we must vote at the city/county level , its as important as State and National level. Don’t get complacent, that’s what happened to our wages/benefits a result of being “scared “employees. Now we are concerned voters, no longer will we assume that all thing are equal and fair play is the “default” setting for voting. They don’t want US to vote and they are making laws to stop us from voting.

  • Amanda MacCloed

    GOP wants to prevent voter fraud? – they are perpetrating the biggest voter fraud I have ever seen by their own exclusionary tactics.

  • freeportguy

    The fix is in!

  • Carol Wright

    One assumes there are those doing just that… One would think the justices themselves would notice that their assumptions of “problem fixed…this is old issue” is NOT correct. They blundered big time.

  • Anonymous

    Fix this now.

  • Anne Dugan

    Hot diggity dog! We the People are paying attention and we can win if we just keep doing so!

  • Owen Johnson

    Ree, I think you could be more careful about generalizing about “white people.” And don’t assume “old white men” are your enemy, either. Neither do 18 year olds know more than most 70 year olds. The reason the GOP is trying to stop young people, people of color, Latinos and women from voting is those are the groups that tend to vote Democrat. Along with more than a few “old white men.”

  • JoeTN

    in two weeks, we honor JFK’s life and legacy on the 50th anniversary of his sad death in Dallas. His legacy includes the beginings of Civil Rights for minorities. The republicans have showed themselves to be as bigoted and racists today as it was in 1963. That is the turly sad state of affairs in the USA today. As someone said, “there is nothing new under the sun.” Thank goodness I AM A LIBERAL!!!!

  • Anonymous

    Having lived in Stinkadena, and having had the KKK try to stop me when I was driving down the street (I am white) to fundraise…I know far too much about that town. And, you notice I said ,TRY to stop me…as I locked the car doors, and hit the gas pedal..the sheets got out of my way! This was in the 80′s in front of their headquarters. Beaumont is just as bad, and we actually refuse to go into Vidor, TX…

  • Anonymous

    Now, wait a minute…don’t put all of us ‘old white people’ in the same category! I walked away from the GOP many, many years ago..as did my husband! We lived in Texas, and had to deal iwth DeLay as our congresscritter, and Ron Paul. We lived in San Antonio, and had SANE Democrats in office, and actually some sane Republicans.. If I have to move back to Texas, it will be to San Antonio, where I feel comfortable.

  • Darlene Oehlke

    Be careful “sonny” with your generalizations. As a high school teacher for the past 24 years, I have not yet met an 18 year old that knows more than someone who is 70. That does not mean that either age group or race should be not be allowed to vote. Clearly, the GOP is trying to stop groups who may vote Democrat. This discussion should not be about age or race or gender. All Americans should be encouraged to vote!

  • Allan Erickson
  • Elayne pallist

    Melva, Your idea is good but huge. It is a different way of voting, a change possibly more dramatic than eliminating the electoral college. Some challenges may be insurmountable, but maybe not – it’s only one person’s opinion. However, I’ll give you my two cents since you asked: With electronic voting, the possibilities for corruption are still enormous, even without direct human intervention. First, selling a new technology will be difficult, especially to the U.S. government. You would be in competition with contractors like Diebold, the makers of voting machines in the 2004 election and subsequent elections and the folks responsible for George W, Bush’s dubious victory in 2004 (or some election experts claim). Since they got the job of supplying voting machines in Ohio and elsewhere through political contributions and outright stated support for the GOP, you would have to do some serious lobbying and campaign contributing and quid pro quo to be considered. As nice as it would be to think the superior technology would win, that just doesn’t happen, especially in Washington.

    Thanks to what we learned about tricks used with Diebold machines, we know how electronic voting is easily hacked: You would have to consider possibilities for cheating beyond the alleged rampant voter impersonation problems: Voters may not be duplicated with your system, but how do you ensure votes get reported at all? How do you stop dead people (or nonexistent people) from voting? (it happened in Chicago all the time under Richard J. Daly and might still be a practice for some aldermen). With everything electronic how do you ensure your vote is secure since you are the only witness to your activity? Diebold flipped votes from “unacceptable” choices (i.e.. Democratic in this case) AFTER the vote was cast. In other words, a vote for John Kerry magically transformed into a vote for Bush by the time it reached their server..

    Storing all the results in one big server reduces transparency and third party oversight. You couldn’t avoid needing a great deal of oversight and established checks and balances to ensure the election was fair.. Just ask the folks in Ohio, New Mexico and Florida. There is no political party – Democrat or Republican – who doesn’t have operatives willing to stoop to suppressing or flipping a vote in any way possible. Just do a search on voter fraud 2004 for a few examples as well as Mike Royko’s (a now deceased journalist who worked at the Chicago Sun-Times decades ago) tales of Chicago election fraud.

    Beyond that, there are the technical difficulties of parsing through the votes for local elections: You say no poll workers would be involved, but who would be counting and verifying and reporting all those votes? Who monitors the lines that would still exist during election season? What if someone was in the wrong ward or precinct and needed directions on where to go? If voting based on ward/precinct location is rendered moot under your system how do you convince state and local officials that taking this control from their office is acceptable or even legal? How would you conduct voting in election years that didn’t include Presidential races – like the one a few days ago? It isn’t likely that the Federal Government would take on the responsibility of storing and monitoring votes for New York City’s Mayor, or a County Judge or local Sheriff or council member. Servers still require maintenance and upgrades, suffer memory shortage and traffic overload (look at the Affordable Healthcare Website’s many problems) and computers still break down. Since one person votes on many different offices as well as miscellaneous ballot initiatives How would this massive server receive hundreds of millions of votes on hundreds – or thousands – of candidates and propositions in a relatively small time frame and correctly record and report all these separate votes?

    Federal takeover of a local election is a also legal obstacle that I don’t see your system being able to overcome: local elections would have to remain under local control because it is considered a state right under the 10th amendment.

    Then there is the politics and organizing aspect, an inevitable part of establishing a new voting system, especially at a Federal level. This
    will actually be the toughest part. You should expect major legal challenges as well as opposition from powerful private interest groups who benefit from a corrupt voting system. You would need overwhelming nationwide support and the ability to effectively lobby Congress. You would have to get positive coverage from the mainstream media.

    Or you could start making changes on a local level first. A working model is always more effective than an untested proposal. May I recommend that you share your idea in a local newspaper (editorial) or pass out flyers for a meeting in your community, inviting others to work on this with you? Long story short, changes of this nature are primarily grassroots initiatives and rarely start in the office of the President or any Senator: You have to make them do it through the force of numbers organized in the most effective way to make imagined change a reality. And the best way is to start small in manageable pieces. That way your probability for success is high even if your goal may not be as grand and expansive as nationwide change. Your biggest allies? Patience, enthusiasm and sincere, focused effort . Good luck!

  • Yvonne

    We need a non-discriminatory voting process just as we have fair housing laws for rental and purchase of housing. Why is this allowed to happen?

  • Anonymous

    We need to get rid of Scalia and Thomas, for starters. They are an embarrassment to modern democracy, both corrupt and superstitious.

  • Anonymous

    Here is an idea. How about a few Supreme Court Justices just admit they screwed up. Clearly the belief they held about America being past this… was way off; not the Republicans – not in Texas, North Carolina, and so on. The perpetuation of entitlement… the fact is that ALL Americans are entitled to vote. No matter what state. I have one question though… how do we fix justices who can’t see straight? Where is the check/balance that slaps them back into shape? Scalia, in particular… can we give this guy a sanity test… a senility test… or maybe there is a sadism test? A head in the sand test? Women, minorities, thinking people… please tell me are ready to put congressmen and local officials in place that actually know what freedom looks like. And perhaps we can call out to the Supreme Court… that they messed this one up… and they need to fix it! A little humility would be a big breakthrough.

  • Anonymous

    Well said Joe. A PROUD LIBERAL !!!!

  • Anonymous

    So, Ari, is there any way for Blacks & Hispanics to fight the blatant discrimination against them or must they endure being effectively disenfranchised? I’d rather relocate than not have any voting power.

  • JudsonAaugust

    Certain members of the Supreme Court are clearly out of touch with the real world. They seem more interested in behaving like Divas than Justices. Makes me wonder what’s been going on on under those robes.

  • Anonymous

    (((((ALLOW TEXAS TO SECEDE)))))

  • Anonymous

    We had just seen the newest statistics on Pasadena on one of the shows and Stinkadena is already Hispanic majority.. Something like 58 percent are Hispanics, but the voting percentage is tremendously low…compared to the white voting numbers….

  • Anonymous

    North Carolina has suffered from right wing destructive forces, funded by the KOCH BROTHERS, of Wichita, KS. The Kochs destroyed Wake County’s public school DIVERSITY program in a multi-year campaign, based on hatred, but the residents of NC’s largest school district fought back and are now rebuilding their crown achievement. They were justly proud of their hard work to get rid of Jim and Jane Crow segregation. WHY doesn’t some young smart person research the Koch’s actions in NC and in KS, to compare/contrast their destructiveness in those two states? Both states have many progressives, as well as many people who cling to the embers of bigotry and white supremacy. The Kochs continually spend mega bucks to fan the embers of hatred. I was born and reared in KS and now live in NC. Martha Warner

  • Anonymous

    The Koch brothers have supported destructive programs in many states, I know, but I think a smart investigator would find some VERY INTERESTING similarities, comparisons, and contrasts if s/he dug into the history of both states. Remember that Brown v Bd. of Education of Topeka, KS was a decision based on segregated schools in the midwest/central state of Kansas, not in the South. Those who believe that ideas of bigotry was limited to southern states need to be introduced to its history in other parts of our nation. It’s PAST TIME for more honest, extensive research on the subject. I wish I had the energy and intellectual resources to work on it, but I’m a retiree who has recently coped with breast cancer, and I’m a bit tired. I do think I beat the cancer, though. Maybe I can locate some hidden energy! When I was growing up in Kansas I attended segregated schools and a segregated Methodist church.

  • Melva

    You have pointed out many issues with my ideas and I appreciate your thoughtful and thorough review of my comments. First, I’m certainly not selling any machines. I’m not a computer expert nor do I own any stock in any such company so my idea is just something I came up with while thinking about all these new voter suppression laws. I’m sure there are people who can come up with much more sophisticated and even reasonable ways to make this work. As for dead people voting, how are they to get voter ID cards? There would need to be pictures, fingerprints, face scans, or some other high tech security involved which many people would object to I’m sure. However, aren’t most of us on camera every day now in public places? Why object to a picture or other way to identify voters? And, yes, the possibility of companies like Diebold getting contracts and managing to rig the system for a particular party or group is there.
    I did think of something else that might be needed and that would be a fairly wide ranging group to oversee all this change. Such a group might include the Vice President (he has less to do than the President), party leaders of the Senate and House, Supreme Court Chief Justice, Governors of a few states, CEO’s of some computer companies (or perhaps just some really bright college students), some private citizens chosen at random, etc. as the oversight committee for making changes and certifying the system were legal and secure. This groups would need to be a broad spectrum of the country.
    I know this won’t happen in my lifetime (I’m 76) but it would be good to know there is movement toward making sure every citizen’s vote actually counted and was guaranteed.
    Your ideas are great and I appreciate the time you took to respond. I hope someone with the power to do something about these issues might decide to consider at least doing something to remedy the very political way we are allowed to vote now. Ohio has had a mess for many years with each county (88) Board of Elections being allowed to decide for themselves how, when and where their voting is done. The Secretary of State did step in last year and force counties to have some of the same rules but again this year counties were pulling tricks and making voting more difficult.
    Thanks again for your feedback.

  • Anonymous

    As a student of sociology I learned that ATTITUDES are complex, and difficult to change, because both information and beliefs and an inclination to act on those beliefs are involved. It’s easier to confront people with accurate information then it is to get them to give up a biased belief. They have “taken a leap of faith” to plant their feet firmly on a belief. More and more info will eventually work to help people confront the truth and change an attitude based on falsehoods, but it does take a lot of education. Take it from me, a high school social studies teacher (retired). Martha Warner

  • Guest

    We live in frightening times. Many are under attach yet we do nothing. That’s the frightening parts.

  • 4Real

    The frightening thing is that we, the people, do not act.

  • Melva

    Hope, I hate to disappoint you but I’m no genius. I’m just a grandmother with a still functioning brain. I have followed politics all my life and have never seen anything like what is going on right now with voting rights. I know there was a time when African Americans had to pay poll taxes and pass tests to vote (actually all voters in WV had to pay a poll tax when I was young) but even then there wasn’t the kind of manipulation of polling places, times for voting, and limiting absentee voting (like is being done in Ohio now) and the constant shifting of districts so incumbents are re-elected forever. My ideas about changes to the voting was formulated out of my frustration with all this craziness. It would not take a genius to figure out a better way to vote than we now have. We might as well be in Afghanistan or Iran the way voting is being done in the US now. I don’t expect to see my ideas put in place any time soon but perhaps if more people speak up and start pushing for changes there can be some good come of all this. Thanks for your feedback.

  • Ree

    You people tend to discount everything that isn’t religious or that is from a demographic other than your own. That’s a LOT of stuff that you consider “wrong” or “bad”. I’d rather speak to an 18 year old who can hear a point of view that isn’t their own and learn from it than someone who automatically dismisses someone because their view isn’t white, christian, or American.

  • Anonymous

    There are lots of us in NC who are really pissed at the GOP and how they are trying to destroy our state. Hopefully we will be able to get them out of office next election. But then again, we voted for Jesse Helms and Sue Myrick for many years. There may be no hope….

  • Obama Fan

    The Ku Klux Klan is still around? Looks like it.

  • Dave

    evolution has nothing to do with it. Think.

  • Dave

    No — we the people can’t because we are not of 1 mind. We can’t even agree that Obama was born in the US

  • Anne Dugan

    Please don’t give up.

  • Anonymous

    I am really hoping Joaquin Castro is on the ticket somewhere! I lived and taught in San Antonio, when Henry Cisneros was mayor, and SA did well. Wish he hadn’t screwed up… Our attorney was Henry B. and his son Charlie..

    There are many in Pasadena who are not illegal, but they still won’t take part because they are afraid of being thought they are illegal, and, like in much of Texas, have been hassled far too many times. I have no idea which of my students were illegal or legal, because we did not ask and if we had been required to, probably would have figured out a way to ‘ignore’ the request.

    I was a federal migrant teacher for a while; I happen to know that all of my students were legal. Many of them went on to college. I spent time at their homes and at parties with families. I really never cared what their status was. We were friends. BTW, my family went into Tejas and were illegal (in 1804..in the Valley. They bailed out of KY over gun ownership and wound up down west of Harlingen where they started farming..and they didn’t buy the land.

  • Anonymous

    my Aunty Bella just got
    Mercedes C-Class Coupe just by part-time work from a home pc. go now w­w­w.B­I­G­29.c­o­m

  • Frank Balls

    Wow, So the Mercedes corporation and BIG29 support the Ku Klux Klan. That’s so sad to hear donniagw595. I’ll be sure to warn my friends.

  • Elayne pallist

    It was a pleasure responding to you, though maybe I was too enthusiastic. I only meant the “you” in my response as a generalized reference to anyone embarking on the project, not specifically you Melva. That would be a lot for one person to accomplish. When questions and ideas like these are proposed I tend to get carried away. Politics is my passion and I also have a background in programming and systems analysis, so I couldn’t resist responding ;-) .

    It seems you have two big projects here that could be handled separately: one is the federal id that would guarantee any citizen the right to vote unchallenged. The other is the technology to gather up votes and have a central office or group in charge of storing/recording/counting the votes. My primary doubt is about the technology. I missed your part about face recognition, or forgot it in writing my response to you.

    You are correct- it would be extremely improbable that the deceased get to vote – but then again I wouldn’t completely dismiss it as being impossible – where there’s a will there’s a way. Hacking can probably get expired social security numbers (i. e. dead people) into the system and even something that seems as foolproof as face/voice recognition can be outwitted if the programming is already rigged. I’m no expert in voting fraud or computer hacking, but I’ve heard some amazing stories about the lengths people will go to to in order to steal elections, as I’m sure you have as well.

    Despite all my protests, I really like the idea of a federal id that could not be challenged by state and local officials. That much would end the primary problem of illegitimate voter suppression. I may have sounded pessimistic in my original response because the question remains if we as citizens have the political will to start demanding changes like these. I certainly hope so. People do seem to be getting riled up. And that outrage could be what the project needs to get up and running More importantly, the federal Id distribution could be accomplished without needing immediate creation of the second part of your plan, the centralized electronic voting system. I still think that it has too many legal and political obstacles to overcome to make it a reality. Even If you had the system created, with enough political opposition in Congress, trying to fund it would be extremely difficult.

    No one wishes more than I do that I am proven wrong. I hope someone does.
    Thanks for taking the time to put your ideas out there.

  • Elayne pallist

    I second Hope’s wish that one day we will take up our banners and demands and march on the House of Reps. Also, we need to end the gerrymandering of these Republican districts where extremists get voted into office by a “majority” of voters who just happen to be Republican, while the Democratic voters are scattered throughout the new districts and left with no political representation, even though they may be the actual majority in that area. That’s another tool of voter suppression that needs to end now!

  • James

    Here the GOP is trying to eliminate elections for the City and County Office and just go with Appointments. lol just do away with all Elections

  • James

    Crotch Brothers will destroy the USA to have the 3rd world Country they can rule over !

  • DowneastDiva

    GOP: If you can’t beat em; cheat em.

  • whomoi

    It’s not a 3rd world country where they live

  • whomoi

    16 isn’t really a good idea. legally they are children. I couldn’t vote until I was 21 and I was happy when the law changed to age 18 but 16 is a child and a 16 year old would be sure to vote as a child.

  • whomoi

    I heard about Art Pope on the Rachel Maddow show. Sounds a lot like Sheldon Addelson only with state politics. That’s all I’ve heard about him and I’m sure there is lots more. Wouldn’t it be nice to forbid private funds from all our elections? Both corporate AND individual. We could have public funding and the country would be so much better off.

  • whomoi

    are you from Texas? did you know they just had succession on the ballot in 11 counties in Colorado? It failed. less than 1/2 of 1 percent of Texans have voiced a desire to succeed and putting it on the ballot hasn’t even been discussed. Why do you ding dongs persist with Texas should succeed BS?

  • whomoi

    problem is that there are many women who believe in the republican agenda. Just as there were many women who were against suffrage.

  • Larry Dillon

    Well they are either oppressing on a “biblical” level or cheating at a white trash one

  • whomoi

    is Vidor still an all white town? I’m from Houston (the heights) and have heard the stories, but there isn’t anything in Vidor anyway, or Beaumont or Pasadena. Sure Pasadena has refinery jobs but other than that, it isn’t much to talk about.

  • Larry Dillon

    We ALLOW children to drive. They are responsible to maintain and control a ton worth of metal zipping down the hwy at 70mph…but they are not responsible enough to vote
    Has 0 logic

  • Anonymous

    Yep, it is still all white… Know the Heights quite well! Stinkadena has some damn good barbecue!!!! Can’t get any here in Floriduh!

  • whomoi

    I’m a proud card carrying bleeding heart liberal. I joined the ACLU just so I could say that. However, the racists back in the 60′s were democrats. They had to switch to Republican because they were so offended by Johnson’s civil rights enforcement.

  • whomoi

    yes, and I believe that drivers under the age of 18 have a different photo and restrictions on driving that adults do not have.

  • whomoi

    hey, if you’re really are a Texan you should be able to barbecue for yourself! nothing beats what you can make at home anyway! backyard grill with some ice cold beer and friends are the best way to spend a Saturday.

  • Anonymous

    Hubby is the Native Texan in the House! I was ‘naturalized Texan’ at Folk Fest in San Antonio when we taught there. My family has been in Texas since 1803 for cousins and great great grandfather bought land from Mexico in Tejas in 1834.

    My BBQ is midwest and NC/TN; just never able to master ribs. Don’t have a smoker for just the two of us any more..

  • Jonathan Brou

    “It looks like they decided to go with voter suppression tactics”
    “It’s a bold move, Cotton. Let’s see if it pays off for them”

  • whomoi

    ah, too bad. Keep looking in Florida, surely there is SOMEPLACE to get Texas barbeque! Good Luck!

  • Steve Bowlus

    I hope you mean “secede.”

  • Anonymous

    Those were the Dixiecrats. Not real Democrats.

  • Anonymous

    Probably by calling you a liar.

  • whomoi

    what do you think? I find it annoying when people who have nothing to contribute will pick on grammar or spelling for lack of anything meaningful to say.

  • whomoi

    they were actual Democrats, just not what you think of as a Democrat today. The Democratic party was the party of racism back in the day, not every one of them obviously….

  • whomoi

    yes, and that same judge worked for Monsanto but has yet to recuse himself from any cases involving them either. He always votes for Monsanto as well.

  • James Wood

    Call you a liar and go ahead and vote GOP straight ticket. Reality is not a strong point to these people. If the amendment had failed and they were denied that vote, their inability to vote would be deemed her fault.

  • cosmicirony

    There are lots of nice little towns in New England, and we don’t try to suppress the vote. We had a little tussle with Britain about voting rights, you might have heard of it!

  • Anonymous

    Get busy organizing to vote her our of office. That is the only solution.

  • scat

    It’s spam, trying to get you to go to anthere site, probably to sell you something. I’ve seen a lot of these popping up lately, mostly advertising some get-rich-quick employment. Just mark it as spam.

  • scat

    Kansas has historically been very conservative and lines up with southern states on many issues.

  • scat

    My understanding was that those counties in Colorado wanted to secede from Colorado, citing vast differences in that area. In other words, they want to be their own state, a rather novel idea.

  • Larry Dillon

    The only restriction is the age on the ID. Under 18 has a profile shot instead of a head on for easy ID of minors.This prevents them from buying cigarettes and alcohol which again is ignorant and easy ID at bars and clubs.Your child can drive at sixteen (no restrictions) but isn’t responsible enough to make a decision to drink or smoke. Better yet we say at 18 they are mature enough to vote as well as go die in wars yet still they are not mature enough to decide if they wish to drink or smoke

    IRRATIONAL

  • whomoi

    you missed the point.

  • scat

    i get the point, just wanted to clarify the facts.

  • The Thinker

    Try Martha’s Vineyard, you would love it! They would welcome you!

  • The Thinker

    I think you’re right, and actually, 18 should be driving age, too many aren’t mature enough, and accident rates prove it.

  • Cherie Fleming

    Slavery is trying to make its way back and this time it won’t matter what color the slaves are.

  • Anonymous

    Greene, Maine is nice enough.

  • Anonymous

    Give Texas BACK to Mexico — forcibly if necessarily — or perhaps swap the whole cesspit for the Baja Peninsula

  • Anonymous

    (((PRECISELY)))

  • James

    it will only matter which gated community you live in

  • Daniel Hill

    pretty much everywhere, But Bedford NH is really nice