Rev. Dr. William Barber II on North Carolina’s Fight for Democracy

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North Carolina: State of Conflict
Editor’s note: The Moral Mondays movement began as a grassroots response to North Carolina’s rightward lurch after Republicans won complete control of the state’s government for the first time since 1870. Modeled on the civil rights movement, it has united a diverse group of citizens in opposition to the draconian legislative agenda that’s turned what was once the most moderate state in the South into a laboratory for conservative ideology. Moyers & Company documented the story in a special, “North Carolina: State of Conflict,” that aired earlier this year.

The movement has since spread to Georgia, and spawned a series of “Truthful Tuesdays” protests in South Carolina. Rev. Dr. William Barber II, head of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, is one of the movement’s key organizers and most prominent spokesperson. This Q&A was excerpted from a longer interview with Barber that first appeared at Political Research Associates earlier this week.

As William Barber prepared to spread a message of hope and democracy through a week of actions Aug. 22-28 in Raleigh and other Southern state capitals, he talked with me about North Carolina’s free-market ideology and how it has already affected the people who live there. Barber, referring to the billionaire-backed tea party, the national group that pushes free-market policies at the local and state level, says these past two legislative sessions have been a “coordinated, premeditated attempt to undermine progress and engage in regressive tea party policies.”

“This is really Robin Hood in reverse,” Barber told me. “It is government of business, bought by business, for business.”

“This is really Robin Hood in reverse,” Barber told me. “It is government of business, bought by business, for business. And not just business — because lots of business leaders disagree with them — but this is tea party greed. This is Koch brother-type greed.”

Barber bristles, though, at the notion that conservatism or partisan politics are at the root of the problem. “I fuss against these terms ‘liberal’ versus ‘conservative’,” he says, “because I want to conserve the essence of our Constitution and then liberally make sure everybody has access to them. What we’re dealing with is extremism, and you can’t just define it as ‘conservative.’”

At the local level, says Barber, the state legislature’s extreme adherence to free-market neoliberal policy is gutting the state’s public school system. “Five thousand teachers being fired, being removed, and local school boards decrying [this] because of the impact that it was having on classroom sizes and students,” he says.

Barber adds that, because of the salary cuts, he sees teachers actively leaving North Carolina. “In fact,” he said, “one state, Texas, sent memos out and said if you’re in North Carolina, come to Texas. And you know that’s kind of sad, considering Texas’s regressiveness, when they actually can offer teachers more than North Carolina.”

Barber also described the legislature’s attempt to shift $10 million earmarked for public schools to voucher programs that could only be used to pay for private schools. In shifting these public funds into private hands, said Barber, the legislature refused to require that private schools benefiting from the vouchers maintain the same non-discrimination standards that public schools must uphold, meaning that private schools receiving voucher funds would have been allowed to restrict enrollment however they chose. A Superior Court judge declared on Aug. 21 that the state’s school voucher program is unconstitutional, citing the lack of accountability inherent in the program, and issued a permanent injunction stopping the voucher program from going forward.

[Conservative mega-donor] Art Pope and the tea party aren’t just alienating teachers and progressives, says Barber. They are also alienating Republicans across the state. Barber says that the legislature and McCrory never made clear, even to their own constituents, what they were planning to do once they achieved a supermajority in the statehouse and won the governorship. “They did not run saying,  ‘Elect me, I’m going to take your health care, cut your public education, and strip you of your unemployment even if you lost your job at no fault of your own,’” says Barber. “So, we’ve had a Republican unemployed person stand on the stage [at a Moral March] and say, ‘I’m a Republican, but I’m unemployed — I didn’t vote for this.’”

Even Republicans holding public office are objecting to the legislature’s actions. Adam O’Neal, a self-described conservative Republican mayor from Belhaven, NC, began a one-man march of 273 miles to Washington DC on July 14 to dramatize the impact of Gov. McCrory’s and  [House Speaker Thom] Tillis’ refusal to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. O’Neal explained that the lack of Medicaid funds had forced the only hospital in his coastal community to close, creating a “medical desert” that would certainly cost lives. O’Neal also lamented the potential economic impact of the hospital closing; he told NPR, “How many people go retire somewhere where it doesn’t even have a hospital?”

“They believe that the way to a great North Carolina is to deny necessary funds and access to public education. Attack teachers.”

I asked Barber what he believes is the neoliberals’ vision for North Carolina. “They believe that the way to a great North Carolina is to deny necessary funds and access to public education. Attack teachers. Deny unemployment. Deny earned income tax credit and other safeguards for the working poor. Deny affordable healthcare and access to healthcare, even if it allows people to die. Deny labor rights, LGBT rights, women’s rights, immigrant rights… And then, if you really want a great America after you’ve done all these things, then suppress the right to vote and attempt to use your power to stay in office. And then, after you’ve done all of that to create all this tension, ensure that everyone has access to guns easier than they have access to the polls. Now, that sounds crude and sinister, but those are their policies.”

Having set this grim scene, Barber continued with a surprisingly upbeat message:  “Whatever we’re facing now, it’s not greater than slavery, it’s not greater than Jim Crow, it’s not greater than women being denied the right to vote. We won those battles. But we did not win those battles by merely engaging in political arguments. We had to tap into the moral and social consciousness of the nation.”

“I am hopeful,” he went on, “because I believe in the deep moral consciousness at the heart of America. Those of us who believe in justice and who believe in freedom, we are the heartbeat of this nation. Our role now is to be like a social defibrillator, to shock the heart of the nation, to cause it to revive and to remember what the real enemy is: regressive extremism. And it’s not just about winning all the elections, but changing the context in which our politicians have to operate.”

Moral Monday (Photo: David Biesack/Flickr CC 2.0)
Moral Monday (Photo: David Biesack/Flickr CC 2.0)

Barber said he hopes that the momentum of the Forward Together Moral Movement (as one of the core groups organizing Moral Marches is currently called) will spread. He sees it moving across the South from North Carolina to help change the political context and create the possibility for the state NAACP’s 14-Point People’s Agenda to be written into legislation both in North Carolina and beyond. The Agenda includes anti-poverty, pro-labor policies; equality and equitable distribution of resources in public education; access to healthcare for all; fairness in the criminal justice system; and protection and expansion of the right to vote and the rights of immigrants.

Barber acknowledges that the neoliberal forces in his state — and across the country — remain powerful. “We’ve got to fight in the courts, we’ve got to fight in the legislative halls, we’ve got to fight in the streets, we’ve got to push at the pulpit, and we have to work at the ballot box,” he says. “If we do all of this with what I call a moral critique, so we’re not trapped with the language of Republican versus Democrat, I believe we can continue to work towards the reconstruction of this nation.”

Mariya Strauss, Political Research Associates
Mariya Strauss is the economic justice fellow at social justice think tank Political Research Associates. You can follow her on Twitter @mariyastrauss.
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  • ccaffrey

    I truly believe that the Forward Together movement coming out of North Carolina is really the best progressive (as opposed to regressive) grass roots model I have seen in a VERY long time. It crosses issue “silos”, and how to build coalitions that last more than a single election cycle. It encourages faith leaders and their membership, so engaged during the Civil Rights movement, to get out of their pews and back in the streets. It is a movement based on a vision of dignity, inclusiveness and human rights. Rev.Barber’s knowledge of history is deep, his courage contagious, and his speaking/preaching powerful and challenging. “We are BETTER than this!” he proclaims, when talking about the policies of the current extreme administration refusing Medicaid expansion and shutting down hospitals, restricting voter rights, and slashing public schools. He attacks these policies as “Constitutionally insconsistent, morally indefensible, and economically insane!” .The coalition has been building for 8 years. There is much to learn from their work. I am more hopeful about this movement than anything I’ve seen or heard in a LONG time. I encourage people to go to his YouTube channel and settle in for some inspiration! It’s the William Barber channel. He also has some videos of coalition meetings, on community building. (my favorite is Walking Above the Snake Line). However, for an introduction you might want to start with his keynote speech to the Net Roots Nation convention this year.or his Pittsburg address to labor folks. They must be doing SOMETHING right!–their March on Raleigh had 85,000 people! I hope we will all watch and learn from this mighty collaboration.

  • Anonymous

    North Carolina is so lucky to have Rev. William Barber working to better conditions in their state.

  • energyrich

    RevBill wants to turn Raleigh into Chicago or Detroit…handing out freebies left and right with NO REGARD as to how the bill gets paid. Hey Rev, not much in this life is free. Medicaid, foodstamps, obamaphones, utility bill assistance, welfare checks, job training, etc etc etc all cost money, money collected by taxpayers. There is only so much we can expect out of our taxpayers and you cannot expect them to keep giving and giving to the same people they have been supporting all of their working lives.

  • Anonymous

    the ‘rev-doctor’ Barber’s plan would cost NC $10BILLION per year …WHO pays HIS health insurance? how many millions has Barber fleeced the taxpayers for his own non profits all cloaked in religion ??? This man is as crooked as a snake, he spews hatred towards white people. Rev. Barber nicknamed ‘the Mardi Gras float on feet’! STRIVE to be SMARTER than the evil democrackkk, the party of SLAVERY, wants you to BE!

  • Anonymous

    He’s a RACIST of the worst kind…hides behind his ‘vestments’…he’s a fraud.

  • sam

    Can you say “Sicko’s”

  • Anonymous

    I don’t see the impact made by Barber here in Randolph County, NC.

  • Anonymous

    I rather watch paint dry.

  • Anonymous

    We need this all over our nation.

  • Jason

    It is going to take nothing less than blood sweat and tears with millions in the streets all over the country at the same time for years… led by very sharp people who are not going to betray the people in the negotiations …any less is not going to win the day