Features related to consumerism

Chad Stunted Nation
April 22, 2014 | Activism

Climate change is a collective problem demanding collective action the likes of which humanity has never actually accomplished. Continue reading

An Occupy Los Angeles protester holds a sign as he walks down the steps during a rally in Los Angeles, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2011. About 100 protesters, chiefly a coalition of labor unions, gathered Thursday morning outside the Bank of America tower on Hope and 3rd streets and marched in a circle chanting "Banks got bailed out, we got sold out." (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
February 21, 2014 | Blog

The cultural critic says the deep state is symptomatic of a neoliberal revolution, where misguided economics drive politics and the welfare state is gutted. Continue reading

Annie-Leonard-garbage
January 4, 2013 | Q&A

Annie Leonard, director of The Story of Stuff, says reusable water bottles and canvas shopping bags are not enough. Continue reading

barber_carousel
November 26, 2012 | Money & Politics

In this Moyers Moment from 2007, political theorist Benjamin Barber describes the holiday tradition of getting consumers to buy things they don’t want or need. Continue reading

Shoppers take advantage of Black Friday sales in the early morning at a Target store. November 2010. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)
November 20, 2012 | Blog
With the holiday shopping season fast approaching, Demos looks at how increasing wages in the retail sector would improve the overall economy.
Televangelist and best-selling author, Joel Osteen and his wife. July 2005. (AP/Jessica Kourkounis)
April 20, 2012

In an excerpt from his book, Ross Douthat says preacher Joel Osteen embodies “the refashioning of Christianity to suit an age of abundance.” Continue reading

BMJ305SG2_DanielGoleman_r
May 15, 2009 | Bill Moyers Journal (2007-2010)

How better educated consumers are the key to building a more sustainable economy. Continue reading

BMJ124SG2_ChrisJordanandCamera_r
September 21, 2007 | Bill Moyers Journal (2007-2010)

Artist Chris Jordan explores feelings about consumerism with his incredible garbage photographs that attempt to quantify how much stuff Americans throw away each minute. Continue reading