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BILL MOYERS: This week Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorganChase testified before the Senate Banking Committee on how his bank got it wrong on risk management-- in London. What would you think if I told you that seven members of the Senate Banking Committee have been big recipients of money from JPMorgan Chase?

THOMAS FRANK: I would not be surprised, (LAUGH) not in the least. That's obviously where JPMorgan would be spending its lobbying dollar would be on the-- the-- you know, giving to the campaigns of the people on that committee. That's the wisest strategic choice for them.

BILL MOYERS: And get this. The bank has been the second largest contributor to Senator Tim Johnson, Democrat, the chairman of the committee . What do you suppose he was thinking as Jamie Dimon testified "Those are great cufflinks Jamie has on. I wonder if I could borrow them."

THOMAS FRANK: Yeah, something like that. And I got news for you. They also -- I mean, you know this already -- they also were one of the biggest donors-- or I should say they're employees to President Obama's campaign in 2008 and also to, I believe, John McCain's campaign in 2008. This is the nature of what they do. They spread their wealth around, you know.

BILL MOYERS: And there's more. One of Senator Johnson's former staffers is now one of JPMorgan's chief lobbyists. And the chairman's present top assistant used to be a lobbyist for a law firm that worked for JPMorgan. I mean, this wasn't a hearing. This was a reunion of the Gambino family.

THOMAS FRANK: Well, look, this is what we call in Washington the revolving door, okay. And this -- if your viewers haven't heard of this they need to learn about it right away 'cause this is how Washington D.C. works-- is that people go back and forth typically from Capitol Hill staffs to working for lobby firms or directly for these, you know, the clients of the lobby firms that have to do with the interests that they used to work on when they were on Capitol Hill.

And then they go back and lobby for their to their former boss, right, and convince him or her to vote one way or the other. And that's how you get ahead in lobbying is you start out working for someone on Capitol Hill, a powerful senator on a given committee.

And then you go and and essentially sell that expertise, sell that the fact that you're friends with that guy to, you know, to a lobbying firm or to a bank or to whoever. That's totally how it works.

But it also has this other aspect to it that's much more nefarious that we have trouble getting our heads around and that is the very fact that this exists, that this relationship exists and that everybody on Capitol Hill knows not necessarily the congressmen and senators, but their staffers know that they could drop what they're doing and go work for a lobby firm and make this kind of, you know, fantastic money, you know, these princely, amazing sums if they do the, you know, right thing for this-- for this company that naturally-- precludes them from certain kinds of legislative-- you know, from-- from going in a certain direction. They want to please those companies even when they don't work for those companies because that's their future employer and everybody knows it.

Jamie Dimon’s ‘Family Reunion’ with the Senate Banking Committee

June 13, 2012

In a preview clip from this weekend’s Moyers & Company, Bill Moyers talks with What’s the Matter With Kansas? author Thomas Frank about the friendly faces greeting JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon when he appeared before the Senate Banking Committee on June 13. Dimon testified about his company’s recent multi-billion dollar losses to the committee, seven members of whom were big recipients of money from the megabank.

Frank describes the revolving door of employment between government and corporate America, especially when it comes to Congressional staffers-turned-lobbyists.

“Staffers know they could drop what they’re doing and go work for a lobby firm and make fantastic money,” Frank tells Moyers. “They want to please these companies — even when they don’t work for those companies –  because that’s their future employer and everybody knows it.” Frank’s most recent book is Pity the Billionaire.

Watch the full episode on Moyers & Company this weekend. Check your local listings.

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  • Anonymous
  • Anonymous

     Hey Bot, dump your spam elsewhere.

  • Anonymous

    I’ll be watching.  Thomas Frank’s monthly column is a prime reason I renewed my Harper’s Magazine subscription.

    Thanks, Bill.  Your reliability in truth-seeking has become a given.

  • WRS

    Amazing that the american people can let these criminals run the show.  What will have to happen before they demand real change?  It didn’t come with Obama and Romney isn’t any better.  I think the human race as a whole is going down… soon, really soon.

  • Carll

    I wonder – is there a place for a folk hero in society this day? Money has power, yes, money IS power but also the voices of
    those who speak of, by, and for the people. Simply by listening, we give power to the voice of a hero like Bill.

  • Anonymous

     ”They say that money talks.  I thought that was the problem, not the solution.”
    ~Paul A. Freund (Prof. – Harvard Law School)

  • tom sanborn

    he said, thats the way wash. dc. works well i don’t think that is the way it supposed to work

  • Sjardon

    Thanks for flagging!