Bill Moyers: Stadium Funding Deals Only Enrich the Plutocrats

  • submit to reddit

In 2008, as the damage from Wall Street’s collapsing house of cards spread through the brick-and-mortar economy, Bill Moyers took an Emmy Award-winning look at the new Yankee Stadium project, seeing in it a shining illustration of our new Gilded Age.

There, in the South Bronx, the poorest district in the entire country, taxpayers were being asked to subsidize the private profits of one of the wealthiest franchises in organized sports. The Yankees’ owner at the time, the late George Steinbrenner, had bought the team for $10 million dollars in 1973, and by the time the old Yankee Stadium — “the House that Ruth built” — was ready to be replaced, it was worth $1.3 billion, according to Forbes.

Taxpayers were promised big bang for their buck, with new jobs and prosperity coming to a neighborhood feeling the full impact of the recession. The claim was considered dubious at the time, and a study conducted in 2011 found that the 3,400 stadium jobs paid a median wage of $10.50 an hour for non-managerial positions. The Yankees, meanwhile, had grabbed $50 million in tax breaks, $326 million in capital improvements, $1.2 billion in tax-exempt bonds and 24 acres of parks that had been owned by the public (after dragging its feet for several years, outrage over the loss of the parks eventually led the city to complete a long-promised facility for local youths last year).

The story is as relevant today as it was in 2008. Earlier this month, Michigan governor Rick Snyder approved a plan to offer $450 million in bonds, subsidized by the residents of Detroit — the biggest American city ever to declare bankruptcy — to build a new arena for the Detroit Red Wings, owned by Mike Ilitch, the billionaire pizza mogul who started Little Caesar’s Pizza.

  • submit to reddit

BillMoyers.com encourages conversation and debate around issues, events and ideas related to content on Moyers & Company and the BillMoyers.com website.

  • The editorial staff reserves the right to take down comments it deems inappropriate.
  • Profanity, personal attacks, hate speech, off-topic posts, advertisements and spam will not be tolerated.
  • Do not intentionally make false or misleading statements, impersonate someone else, break the law, or condone or encourage unlawful activity.

If your comments consistently or intentionally make this community a less civil and enjoyable place to be, you and your comments will be excluded from it.

We need your help with this. If you feel a post is not in line with the comment policy, please flag it so that we can take a look. Comments and questions about our policy are welcome. Please send an email to info@moyersmedia.com

Find out more about BillMoyers.com's privacy policy and terms of service.

  • Anonymous

    Only in America. This country is surely doomed when its people don’t know what’s best for them.

  • Anonymous

    I don’t understand why people vote for financial pain. Then pay huge prices to go to a game. :/

  • Jeo Ten

    So it’s not okay for taxpayer funded stadiums but it’s perfectly fine for taxpayer funded programs on TV like Bill Moyers.

  • Anonymous

    I think we have proof of what happens when people do not oppose this kind of priority — the Roman Coliseum is the remnant of that civilization. Oh! But they got their gol durned stadium!

  • sy

    Another problem: around the country where these new playgrounds for millionaires are being built, children are attending schools that are 60 to 100 yrs old, that dont have enough text books, or up to date ones, and moral is affeced by that more than it is by the prospects of the needle in a hay stack of a chance of becoming a brainless millionaire athlete. We need to focus on what makes our society and communities more whole and prosperous.